The ELCR Resource Library is a robust resource of articles, tools, templates, videos and “how-to” tutorials to help horsemen and women experiencing local land related issues. To help the public navigate these vast resources, we have developed a list of “Frequently Asked Questions” to help guide you through the Resource Library to the appropriate resources relating to your particular issue.

Simply look for the question below that best represents your issue and click on the resource links below the question. If you still have questions or need assistance after accessing these resources, you can submit a technical assistance request by clicking here and ELCR will responding directly to your request for assistance.

 

Equine Access to Private Land

Q: The trail on which we have been riding goes through several private properties. One of the property owners has said that we can no longer ride on their property, as they are afraid of liability in case of injury. What should we do? (Topic area: Liability Issues)

1404236529_align-leftReducing Recreational Riding Risk

1404236529_align-leftDirectory of Equine Activity and Recreational Use Statutes for Horsemen and Landowners

1404236529_align-leftLandowner Relations – A Complex Issue Affecting Short and Long-Term Hunt Viability

1404236529_align-leftPrivate Lands and Open Trails

Q: We have been riding across privately owned property for years. Recently the owner of the private property passed away and the heirs want to sell the property and have applied for a zoning change so that it can be subdivided and developed for houses. What can we do to stop the zoning change? Can we prevent the property from being sold that way, and keep it as agricultural/fields? (Topic area: land conservation, planning and zoning)

1404236529_align-leftChronicling Success: An Update on the Preservation of Callithea Farm as an Equine Park

1404236529_align-leftLocal Planning and Zoning Practices Related to Equine Facilities

1404236529_align-leftSeven Steps to Planning for an Equestrian-Friendly Community for Community Leaders and Planners

1404236529_align-leftPlanning and Zoning Guide for Horse Friendly Communities

Q: We live in an equine friendly community with many private land owners. We are interested in developing a local trail system that would require access to private land. Where do we start? (Topic areas: land conservation, liability issues)

1404236529_align-leftAssuring Equestrian Access: Easements Assure Access to Equestrian Haven in North Carolina

1404236529_align-leftPrivate Lands and Open Trails: Organizing to Preserve Trails in Tryon

1404236529_align-leftEssex Country Trail Association

1404236529_align-leftGetting Organized: Creating an Equestrian Trail Organization

1404236529_align-leftFinding Funds for Your Private Land Trails

1404236529_align-leftReducing Recreational Riding Risk

1404236529_align-leftDirectory of Equine Activity and Recreational Use Statutes for Horsemen and Landowners

 

Equine Access to Public Land

Q: We ride on a trail on public land that is managed by the Fish and Wildlife Service. They have recently closed a section of the trail saying that we are doing too much damage to a habitat area. There is no way to get around this trail without spending a lot of money and time that we don’t have. What can we do to get our trail back? (Topic area: trail stewardship, public land manager relations, sustainability)

1404236529_align-leftHorse Trail Access: Protect It or Lose It

1404236529_align-leftConsidering Trail Closures on Public Agency Lands: U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

1404236529_align-leftSaving Our Endangered Trails

Q: We ride a trail that goes through a Forest Service area. We have been having some trouble with trail conditions and people don’t stay on the trail, which makes things worse. The Forest Service manager has complained to our riding group about damage to the trail. What can we do to solve this problem? (Topic area: trail stewardship, public land manager relations)

1404236529_align-leftHorse Trail Access: Protect It or Lose It

1404236529_align-leftSaving Our Endangered Trails

1404236529_align-leftConsidering Trail Closures on Public Agency Lands: U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Q: For many years we have enjoyed access to a local public beach for horseback riding. Recently the local government has moved to deny equine access to the beaches. What can be done to retain access for equine activities? (Topic area: economic issues (recreation), community planning and zoning)

1404236529_align-leftSaving Our Endangered Trails

 Q: We have recently been denied access or are experiencing restricted access for our horses on a public multi-user trail. What can be done? (Topic area: trail stewardship, public land manager relations)

1404236529_align-leftHorse Trail Access: Protect It or Lose It

1404236529_align-leftSaving Our Endangered Trails

1404236529_align-leftSweat Equity and Cooperation Leads to Successful Shared Trails: Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forests Model What Works in Shared Trails

1404236529_align-leftCan’t We All Just Get Along?

Q: We have long enjoyed access to a public park for equine activities but are feeling competition with other recreational user groups, such as expanding soccer fields, and fear losing access to this public recreational area. What can be done to ensure that we can retain access to this recreational space?  (Topic area: public land manager relations, benefits of horses to your community)

1404236529_align-leftUsing Public Lands for Competition

1404236529_align-leftSustain Your Horse Park Series: Masterson Station Park

1404236529_align-leftSuccessful Strides: A Pony Club Plays a Big Role in Maintaining Their Equestrian Park

 

Development, Planning and Zoning

Q: I have been boarding horses for years on my four acre property. I live there, and the horses are partially mine and some belong to boarders.  My barn has room for 10 horses. Some nearby neighbor complained to the town about the odors and about traffic on the weekends when boarders tend to come and ride their horses. I never had problems with this before, but some of the nearby properties have recently sold.  The town is telling me that I have to reduce the number of horses I keep. What should I do? (Topic area: community planning/zoning, economic issues, best management practices)

1404236529_align-leftHow Many Horses Can I Keep? – Equine Ordinances Control the Numbers

Q: Our community has a history of horse ownership and small horse properties, and has access to a trail system. Recently, developers are purchasing abandoned properties in the area and proposing or building housing and commercial property. The city is supporting this development and trying to ‘encourage’ people in the neighborhood to sell their properties to developers.  Even if we don’t sell, we feel that the historic nature of our small horse facilities and the equine community feel is being destroyed. What should we do? (Topic area: economic issues, community planning and zoning, land conservation)

1404236529_align-leftOpen and Green: Conserving Horse Lands to Sustain Your Community and Economy

1404236529_align-leftCore Issue Area: Benefits of Horses to Our Communities

1404236529_align-leftDriving to Save Horse Country: The Walthour-Moss Foundation

 Q: We have very few places to board near our neighborhood, which has become very dense and urbanized over the last decades. There is a lot of pressure on the few facilities that are left to sell out. What can we do as a small group of equestrians to help these folks to hold on to their boarding facilities and not sell out? (Topic area: economic/cultural issues, community planning and zoning, land conservation)

Please check back soon for resources related to this question.

Q: I am a member of a riding club and horse land protection organization. We would like to help our local parks department to acquire some land next to one of the larger parks that has access to horse trails. The existing park has an old barn that could be refurbished for boarding or at least day access. We would need to build a riding ring and improve the trails, plus add some new trails to connect to a trail system that runs through some government land a couple of miles away. Where should we start? (Topic area: economic issues (recreation), community planning and zoning)

1404236529_align-leftAssuring Equestrian Access: Easements Assure Access to Equestrian Haven in North Carolina

Q: We live in a community with a rich equine culture and history but recently there has been continued development with little consideration about the impact on the culture of our community and horse keeping.  Some of the horsemen are concerned about the future of our community with regard to horse keeping and equine activities. What can be done to keep the community horse friendly? (Topic area: economic issues (recreation), community planning and zoning)

1404236529_align-leftThree Words Every Equestrian Should Know: Land Use Planning

1404236529_align-leftHow Many Horses Can I Keep? – Equine Ordinances Control the Numbers

1404236529_align-leftLocal Planning and Zoning Practices Related to Equine Facilities

1404236529_align-leftSeven Steps to Influencing Horse Friendly Planning for Horsemen

1404236529_align-leftPlanning and Zoning Guide for Horse Friendly Communities

Q: I have a moderately sized piece of farmland that I would like to board horses on, give lessons and connect to a nearby trail for trail rides. What can I do to help with expenses? Are there any government funds or grants that would help me with some of the work? Can I get donations to help out? (Topic area: equine economic impact, community planning)

Please check back soon for resources related to this question.

Q: We have been riding across privately owned property for years. Recently the owner of the private property passed away and the heirs want to sell the property and have applied for a zoning change so that it can be subdivided and developed for houses. What can we do to stop the zoning change? Can we prevent the property from being sold that way, and keep it as agricultural/fields? (Topic area: land conservation, planning and zoning)

1404236529_align-leftThree Words Every Equestrian Should Know: Land Use Planning

1404236529_align-leftSeven Steps to Influencing Horse Friendly Planning for Horsemen

1404236529_align-leftPlanning and Zoning Guide for Horse Friendly Communities

 

Land conservation

Q: I currently own a large property that allows equine access. How do can I protect the land from development and retain equine access on the land? (Topic area: land protection)

1404236529_align-leftWhat is a Conservation Easement and How Can It Help?

1404236529_align-leftEquestrian Land Protection Guide

1404236529_align-leftSample Equestrian-Friendly Conservation Easement

1404236529_align-leftGuide to Equestrian-Friendly Conservation Easements

Q: The stable that I board/ride at is being sold. What can be done to keep it open to horses and horse related activities? (Topic area: land protection, community planning)

1404236529_align-leftWhat is a Conservation Easement and How Can It Help?

1404236529_align-leftChronicling Success: An Update on the Preservation of Callithea Farm as an Equine Park